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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
My first gold 10 would not cycle straight out of the box sent it back to Browning and they couldn’t get it to run either. Browning then sent me the newest version of it and I shot about 9 boxes of shells through it, the gun has failed to cycle about a half dozen times or so. I broke the gun down when I got it and cleaned out the factory grease. I have shot a Mag 10 Ithaca for years and had some failures and cycle issues too. I will say that the Browning kicks so much harder than the Ithaca, the gold 10 actually bruised my should a little and the Mag 10 never did that. I had Les at Diamond Gunsmithing work his magic on the Mag 10 and that gun ran 2 boxes without any issues. I broke the gold 10 back down after my last day in Arkansas and there are burrs sticking up on the inside of the receiver, I am going to take a small file and stone to smooth these down and some steel wool to the inside of the receiver and bolt rails. After shooting the gold 10 You couldn’t trade me 2 for 1 of my Mag 10’s, I am less than impressed with this new gun. In 10 gauge I would say stick with the Ithaca or Remington 10’s and just have some mods done. The recoil from my Mag 10 is so much less and I know the gun is lighter I get it. I will say Browning has top shelf customer service, they replaced the first gold 10 and it was over 3 years old, but also had never been shot before I just used it as a backup in Arkansas rice fields. All this of course is my opinion but look at the pictures of the receiver.
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I lengthened the forcing cone to approx 2.5 in. This reduced the recoil.
What I had to do to my Gold Light was polish the magazine tube, barrel extension were the bolt rides, and any internal part I could see wear. Have not had one malfunction since. The Gold 10‘s bolt is not connected to the action barrs light other gas autos. Runs on a gas pulse system. If there is any resistance it will not function properly.
 

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Ive been shooting mine since 07 nothing but reloads i've got alot of wear but nothing like that i'll have to check it in the morn.Those rails look rough mine are as smooth as glass mine will jam from time to time mostly cause its dirty.Just to follow up i checked my gun for for that dent on the front of your receiver mine has it as well but its a little smoother.Its been there since i bought the gun.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I lengthened the forcing cone to approx 2.5 in. This reduced the recoil.
What I had to do to my Gold Light was polish the magazine tube, barrel extension were the bolt rides, and any internal part I could see wear. Have not had one malfunction since. The Gold 10‘s bolt is not connected to the action barrs light other gas autos. Runs on a gas pulse system. If there is any resistance it will not function properly.
Yeah I went back and filed down the burrs and steel wooled the rest till it was slick cleaned it good and I will try it again in a couple days and see what it does. It is a shame the these high end autos have burrs kicked up on the inside of the receiver but I do realize the day and age we are in though. Keep your expectations low and you will be seldom disappointed. I honestly didn’t expect much from the Japanese gun anyway, I do love my American steel. Long live my Mag 10. Big corporations have sold us out to get filthy rich IMO.
 

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Yeah I went back and filed down the burrs and steel wooled the rest till it was slick cleaned it good and I will try it again in a couple days and see what it does. It is a shame the these high end autos have burrs kicked up on the inside of the receiver but I do realize the day and age we are in though. Keep your expectations low and you will be seldom disappointed. I honestly didn’t expect much from the Japanese gun anyway, I do love my American steel. Long live my Mag 10. Big corporations have sold us out to get filthy rich IMO.
Yes mass production. I had to shim the forearm of my Gold 10 lite. There was play in the barrel allowing movement of the barrel.
I have three different versions of the Gold 10 steel receiver. Carrier latch parts will not interchange. Two guns have a milled out section inside the receiver allowing the shell coming out of the magazine tube to float. These two guns if cycled by hand too slowly the shell coming out of the magazine will release and jam, and having to take gun completely apart to get shells out.
The current design does not allow this to happen.
I don’t use the original Gold lite barrel it shot high and to the left.
The bolt has had some changes to the hook part. The hook part distance is closer or farther back from the bolt face head.
I used 600 grit to sand the rough machine tooling on the magazine tube, barrel extension, and any contact part on the trigger group and bolt parts.
I have the reamer from Pacific tool to lengthen the forcing cone, and polish the forcing cone with brush research hone brush. This reduced the perceived recoil.
I inherited a Mag 10, have not used it.
 

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Yeah I went back and filed down the burrs and steel wooled the rest till it was slick cleaned it good and I will try it again in a couple days and see what it does. It is a shame the these high end autos have burrs kicked up on the inside of the receiver but I do realize the day and age we are in though. Keep your expectations low and you will be seldom disappointed. I honestly didn’t expect much from the Japanese gun anyway, I do love my American steel. Long live my Mag 10. Big corporations have sold us out to get filthy rich IMO.
I know this thread died out in Jan, but FWIW...

You got more out of Browing than I ever did. I have done a lot of work with the G10 in the past 2 years and found about every kink in the system. I have also had to diagnose and recommend fixes for close to a dozen of them as well. Honing and polishing the chamber, feed ramp, and bolt rails, in addition to replacing springs and working on the extractor is a big factor in getting the G10 to run reliably.

I have videos and a full article on the gun, it's potential problems and fixes:

Full Review Article (Malfunctions and fixes towards the end) - The Browning Gold 10 Field: The Good, The Bad, and the Monstrously Hideous

Chamber Honing-
 

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With the advances in bismuth and other loads I think the mighty 10 will soon be dead.
The same has been said of the 16ga, yet here we stand today. So, no, it won’t die. The hard core fans the Mighty 10 like myself keep it alive. It has about the same or slightly greater level of following that it has had for the past 20 years: minor but strong. Applying modern advances and greater-than-Steel density non-tox shot types to the big 10 offers significant improvement in its capabilities that put it on par with, or above and beyond, the performance of traditional 2oz lead loads for the Magnum 10.

Federal Premium, Winchester-Olin, Boss Shotshells, Environmetal (Hevi-Shot), and Remington all still offer 10ga loadings, many of which are modernized for non-tox loads. There is a significant amount of the ammunition present every year and Browning still is accommodating for the bore’s fandom with the BPS-10 and Gold 10 shotguns. Every time the ammunition or shotguns dry up, the fans create enough of a rumble that another production run is placed into the cue and soon they are placated. Honestly, the market for the bore could handle another Ammo manufacturer and another Shotgun in the 10 bore to out-due Browning and increase the supply. 10ga everything was scooped up rapidly over the past 2 years and I have seen more of them being taken to the field and discussed than in many years prior. Especially when looking at using denser-than-steelnon-tox shot types.

The 10 bore has always had its place in the American fowling world and it will continue to do so for the foreseeable future.
 

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The same has been said of the 16ga, yet here we stand today. So, no, it won’t die. The hard core fans the Mighty 10 like myself keep it alive. It has about the same or slightly greater level of following that it has had for the past 20 years: minor but strong. Applying modern advances and greater-than-Steel density non-tox shot types to the big 10 offers significant improvement in its capabilities that put it on par with, or above and beyond, the performance of traditional 2oz lead loads for the Magnum 10.

Federal Premium, Winchester-Olin, Boss Shotshells, Environmetal (Hevi-Shot), and Remington all still offer 10ga loadings, many of which are modernized for non-tox loads. There is a significant amount of the ammunition present every year and Browning still is accommodating for the bore’s fandom with the BPS-10 and Gold 10 shotguns. Every time the ammunition or shotguns dry up, the fans create enough of a rumble that another production run is placed into the cue and soon they are placated. Honestly, the market for the bore could handle another Ammo manufacturer and another Shotgun in the 10 bore to out-due Browning and increase the supply. 10ga everything was scooped up rapidly over the past 2 years and I have seen more of them being taken to the field and discussed than in many years prior. Especially when looking at using denser-than-steelnon-tox shot types.

The 10 bore has always had its place in the American fowling world and it will continue to do so for the foreseeable future.
Federal blue in the 10ga is $1.40 a squeeze at $349 a case. 12 gauge BOSS Bismuth $1.50 a squeeeze at $300 a case of 200 shells. Bismuth vs steel …….enough said.
 

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Federal blue in the 10ga is $1.40 a squeeze at $349 a case. 12 gauge BOSS Bismuth $1.50 a squeeeze at $300 a case of 200 shells. Bismuth vs steel …….enough said.
That may be enough said for you, and you may have no interest in the mighty 10, but that does not mean it is so for others.

Boss 28ga runs $1.475 a shot by the case and crushes ducks inside of 35 yards; Is that enough said about the 28ga vs every other gauge?

Boss 10ga runs $2.85 a shot by the case for 2+ oz of copper plated bismuth punishment. For what the 10ga is for, it’s the bees knees.

We can argue semantics on cost per round and shot types all day, but that won’t make a hill of bean’s difference for what each gauge is best at doing. They all have a purpose, and a good fowler does well to have several or all of them in his arsenal. The 10,16, 28, and 410 are not going to die in the foreseeable future just because many find the most use out of the 12 and 20.
 
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