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I am 16 and live in TN, my friend and I have flyfished the clinch pretty religiously for the past 4-5 years and we see a lot of geese and greenheads on it. It wasn't until yesterday that I found out that you are allowed to duck hunt on the clinch.We figured we'd give it a shot but there isn't a boat ramp there,so how realistic is shooting 3 1/2's or mag 3's out of a canoe without being unsafe? thanks a lot. this site is awesome. the emoticons are pretty cool too,
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Put some stabilizers on the side of that canoe! How deep is it where you are hunting?

I would never hunt out of a canoe in water deeper than I could stand. I am a clutz and always seem to find a way to get wet....
 

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well, its probably 6 ft. when waters generating and only about 1-2 when its not, but then you stand the chance of a lot of flyfisherman being there, even in the cold months. I might just borrow a friends little 12 ft. john w/ .9 hp engine and see how that works.
 

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bassinator....a canoe is the most versatile craft a waterfowler should own.....except for large open waters or ocean when windy/rough.....shooting from a canoe is not an issue, unless you start spinning around and are 'jumpy). I have hunted from a canoe all my years waterfowling and never had a problem. Using an auto will help, since you do not have to pump the gun. Position correctly and you should'nt have to be pivoting anyhow. Stabilizers will give you a comfort level for sure although are very cumbersome I'd imagine hiding the boat in grasses or reeds.....how about driving a couple rebar poles into the mud to hold your position and stabilize the boat?

btw....no need for 3'5" shells anyhow....just be on target
 

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I do not own a canoe anymore, but when I did, I realized my mortality rather quickly. I also would not hunt from a canoe in any water over my waders. Most of my problems in a canoe came with its stability, changing weather and most of all--other hunters. I've been tipped over by other guys with 90 hp motors flying down the river at 5 AM :thumbsdown: . Anyway, if your going to invest in a canoe---I suggest a flat botttomed 12' boat, if anything--for the safety. If your set on a canoe--know your surroundings and be careful!
 

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If you do hunt from your canoe,and use the good advice already given, just remember to ALWAYS wear floatation! Stay clear of rough water and make sure you let someone know where you are going to be hunting just in case. :thumbsup:
 

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The only areas I would hunt with a canoe are small shallow areas where you know some moron cant get his 20 ft bass boat with a 750 horsepower yamaha twin prop lightning bolt thru there. Yes you can save money by getting a canoe but beware, if you get caught on a windy day or somebodies wake, you stand a good chance of taking a drink.

I used mine strictly for transport to and from duck holes and their o.k. I never even thought of trying to shoot duck out of it. Stabilizers or not, a flat bottom is a far cry more suitable. More storage, more stable, your more comfortable shooting out of them because you can swivel around 360 degrees. I would get a small cheap flat bottom and a good trolling motor and be done with it. You can add a bigger outboard later on.

Not only that...when duck season ends...you can fish alot more water in a jon boat than in a canoe. Sorry this reply is so long.

Good luck
 

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I used a canoe for hunting this whole season so far, but that was mostly to get to and from our spots. If we are drifting the river or jump shooting from the canoe then we just have the person up front shoot facing over the bow and the person in back paddling and steering. My canoe is lightweight , and if I was the only person in it I wouldn't hesitate to hunt from it. The main thing is not having to worry about the other person in the canoe. One great thing about canoes to is that they are light and super easy to transport if you hunt alone.
On a side note I ended up in the drink in late november in 40 degree water when we pulled up to the ramp and my buddy jumped out rather quickly. You never really know how cold 40 degree water is until it's heading south in your waders. I did end up getting a 12 ft rowboat for free a week ago, but have to wait until it warms up enough to check for leaks before I camo it. I plan on having a 16 footer next season for the bigger water.

WEAR A LIFE-JACKET.
 

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i have used canoes a few times in the summer. i would never use one for hunting regardless. they are a death trap. if you go in the drink and your over your head specially with waders. search and rescues gonna be looking for you at the bottom of the river. even in shallow water who wants to tip over and get all wet a be freezing cold all day or tell you get back to your rig. you should get a jon boat. always wear your lifejacket!
 

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wise man say dont do it.
 

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DUKHTR said:
Stabilizers will give you a comfort level for sure although are very cumbersome I'd imagine hiding the boat in grasses or reeds.....how about driving a couple rebar poles into the mud to hold your position and stabilize the boat?
Driving poles into the bottom on both side and both ends of the canoe works great, also tie the poles togther with a piece of rope or twine, stable as hell! I do this a lot when hunting non-motorized areas-stable enough to stand and shoot.
 
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