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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Up until recently I have used a Foiles Legend as my primary call. I don't know who else uses rubber stoppers in calls as opposed to cork, but I find my rubber stopper tends to lose a little holding power as time goes on. The result is often a funny sound in the call and when pulling the call apart, the reeds and guts want to fall out real easy (fine if I'm inside, but no good in a boat or on a windy day).
I can usually put the stopper in my mouth and chew it a bit to hold better, but that's not the best fix always. I practice daily, and replace my reed and cork a couple times per year when I'm on top of things.
My question is this - has anyone replaced the rubber with cork, and does it last longer? It seems cutting rubber would be harder than cork, and I don't want to drop the money to replace everything when the reeds are fine and the cork is the weak link.
Thoughts/Opinions?
-Erik
 

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among all the calls I have, two of them have the rubber piece you are talking about. I replaced them with cork because I too found that the reeds were slipping and with a lot of spit they went flatter sooner. The cork stopped all this. They both even sound a lot better.
 

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Its not going to change the sound much at all.

Sometimes i find that it gives me a more "natural" sound to put cork in. But you are going to have to change the cork more often than a rubber stopper because the cork will go flat, and after time, the sound of the call isnt going to be as crisp.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Well that clears up a bit. Perhaps I wasnt clear that sound difference wasn't my primary concern - really more of the longevity/durability issue. If I understand you correctly, however, there would be no savings as far as time between changes of the stopper from rubber to cork?
Thanks for the input guys. I might give it a go in a call though just to see.
-Erik
 

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Corks are the worst on my opinion. I blow my call at leat an hour a day and i was going through corks left and right. I have had a rubber wedge in my call and i havent changed it in over a year and this thing still rocks. How often do you blow your calls? maybe the rubber gets bad if you dont for a while, but as far as i'm concerned, rubber is the #^@%!!!

:thumbsup:
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Daily. I usually keep my calls with me so I can practice while driving around for work and on the way to and from. So I guess I usually practice 15-30 minutes a day depending on how much driving I get in. I appreciate the advice though it doesnt sound totally conclusive, so like I say I might as well give it a try.
-Erik
 

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try putting chap stick on the rubber, it keeps it lubricated and seems to help in longevity, I do it on double o rings in my goose call as well
 

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Corks are the worst on my opinion. I blow my call at leat an hour a day and i was going through corks left and right. I have had a rubber wedge in my call and i havent changed it in over a year and this thing still rocks. How often do you blow your calls? maybe the rubber gets bad if you dont for a while, but as far as i'm concerned, rubber is the #^@%!!!

👍
Where does one buy the rubber in sheet form
 

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Buy Lares...problem solved
Can't believe I accidently hit the "like," instead of "reply," because I'd sure rather not be stuck hunting with any of the Lares I've owned (standard bore T-1 and Magnum Hen) or borrowed (Hybrid and ACH). Different strokes...

Haven't liked the way the rubber and composite corks I've tried seemed to flatten a call's tone when compared to good cork. And I actually like changing cork when it starts to go flat, as it's like getting a new brighter/crisper call.
 

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Can't believe I accidently hit the "like," instead of "reply," because I'd sure rather not be stuck hunting with any of the Lares I've owned (standard bore T-1 and Magnum Hen) or borrowed (Hybrid and ACH). Different strokes..
Haven't liked the way the rubber and composite corks I've tried seemed to flatten a call's tone when compared to good cork. And I actually like changing cork when it starts to go flat, as it's like getting a new brighter/crisper call.
yup...different strokes....I'll take Lares all day over rnt....the fact that they don't stick is a big bonus, as is the ease of tuning. I've owned rnt as well as many others and couldn't get past the sticking factor...a deal breaker for me....condensation is a killer. The fact that no wedge replacement is needed is also a plus.
 

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yup...different strokes....I'll take Lares all day over rnt....the fact that they don't stick is a big bonus, as is the ease of tuning. I've owned rnt as well as many others and couldn't get past the sticking factor...a deal breaker for me....condensation is a killer. The fact that no wedge replacement is needed is also a plus.
RNTs were "stick-n-tones" for me, too - until I learned the value of fresh cork. Since then, I've run a RNT, usually a MVP, at least most of every open morning for what's now pushing two decades without sticking. And I'm an "aggressive" caller. Clear and crisp has given me more leverage than the rasp and rattle of calls like Lares (or RNT's early Daisy Cutters and/or Mondos), and never mind what's "duckier".
 

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RNTs were "stick-n-tones" for me, too - until I learned the value of fresh cork. Since then, I've run a RNT, usually a MVP, at least most of every open morning for what's now pushing two decades without sticking. And I'm an "aggressive" caller. Clear and crisp has given me more leverage than the rasp and rattle of calls like Lares (or RNT's early Daisy Cutters and/or Mondos), and never mind what's "duckier".
I tried that...numerous times, always got sticky when things start to cool down. It appears condensation doesn't care about new corks or reeds....
 

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I tried that...numerous times, always got sticky when things start to cool down. It appears condensation doesn't care about new corks or reeds....
Glad not to have found condensation an issue, but do have to keep calls under a layer of clothes when temps hit the 20s or, really cold for us, teens to keep them from freezing up. I'm often super aggressive and sometimes even drooling at the corners of my mouth spitty, but just not what some contest callers have characterized as "iguana spit," perhaps...
 

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Glad not to have found condensation an issue, but do have to keep calls under a layer of clothes when temps hit the 20s or, really cold for us, teens to keep them from freezing up. I'm often super aggressive and sometimes even drooling at the corners of my mouth spitty, but just not what some contest callers have characterized as "iguana spit," perhaps...
I used to do that as well, but ,thankfully, a few callmakers turned me in a better direction
 

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Lares IS the heat...😉...but back to the original post...I'd take rubber over cork all day....my preference...cork expands and contracts to much to stay consistent
That's just silly. Spit will freeze in Lares calls, and it isn't moisture but time under pressure that makes cork eventually lose it's elasticity and change tone. And it's not like the same doesn't happen with Lares' wedges over time. Though it's likely the great majority of those plastic springs are sold because their pull-stems broke, given how few folks would notice a gradual change - or think it the reed's fault.

Anyway, while I can't envision ever owning another Lares, it's great that you're happy with yours. Tune-by-numbers reeds even the blind, crippled and crazy can experiment with for better personal fit without being terrified of boogering something really was a bit of marketing "wizardry".
 
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