Duck Hunting Forum banner
1 - 20 of 21 Posts

· Registered
Joined
·
1 Posts
Very nice, Ive built a few of Zach Taylors Widgeons and have used them on the Hudson River, they are very stable and we get some huge barges that come through here. You did a great job with your widgeon. Ive also built a modified version of the Barnegat Bay Sneak box with a plywood bottom. That was fun to figure out since the Barnegat Bay sneak box was built with cedar planking and the bottom is made up of compound angles. Again great job! +
 

· Registered
Joined
·
9 Posts
thanks i have the perrinie plans for the barnegat sneak box from Mistic sea port ,been wanting to build it like the original box. Good clear cedar is getting hard to come by!
There is Clear cedar around but becomming very pricey. I used to know a guy on Jersey that milled it and had good pricing for it but he since passed away. The Barnegat is a very stable craft and and fun build but very difficult to use plywood for the bottom planking in the build.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
29 Posts
Discussion Starter · #14 ·
sure, as i go along, I can post pictures, the first one i build was back in the early 70's !m sorry i have no pictures of it being built, of the finish boat that i posted,. A friend wanted to buy the finished one but i promised it to me grandson so I'm building one for the friend.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
15 Posts
I built several of Zack Talyor's Whistlers (AKA gunning jonboat). I've built them as 10'. 11' and 12' boats and they work great in marshes and swamps where water is relatively calm. They hide great in shallow cover. This is my 11 footer and my favorite.
 

Attachments

· Registered
Joined
·
29 Posts
Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Being form northern Maine I have a lot of eastern white cedar. but the long wide clear boards are hard to come by, I was able to get the ones for the side boards on the sneak box from a very good friend who runnes a saw mill.no too far away.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
15 Posts
Being form northern Maine I have a lot of eastern white cedar. but the long wide clear boards are hard to come by, I was able to get the ones for the side boards on the sneak box from a very good friend who runnes a saw mill.no too far away.
When I built my first Zack Taylor Whistler, his plans called for 3/4" planking for the sides so I used 3/4" clear pine. That was a 12 footer and it came in around 150 pounds dry.. I've since switched to 1/4" marine plywood for the sides, bottom and deck. I use the stictch and glue technique and make the ribs from 3/4" red cedar. All surfaces receive 4 coats of marine epoxy and I use 6 oz fiberglass cloth on the bottom and sides and 4 oz for the decks. I run a 2 1/2 hp Yamaha on them now but could go bigger. I have motored through ice up to 1" thick with no damage or marks on the hull. Not sure if 1/4" marine ply is heavy enough for the Widgeon but 1/2" should be fine. I lap join 8' pieces of pywood to get the length I need using the 1:8 ratio of ply thickness to joint width and bond with marine epoxy. I also add a strip of fiberglass cloth over the lap joint for added strength.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
15 Posts
Great build and man I'd love to have a wood shop like that! my shop tools are in my basement and I can't get a boat out of there. I build mine in my barn with a gravel floor so I have to work in the summer. I thought of building a Widgeon but there are no boat ramps at my favorite marsh so I have to deploy my boats over a guard rail. I'm too old to handle a heavier boat like yours up a bank and over a guardrail.
 
1 - 20 of 21 Posts
Top