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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello all! New to the site. I hope someone can offer some help with my situation.

I have a 3 1/2 mo old lab who already knows all the basics and is a great retriever excited and focused when training. However, when I throw and send her she chases it down but with some anger, growling while running and upon picking it up she growls and gives it a "death shake" and growls all the way back before giving it back to me in a somewhat gentle manner???? How would I repremand in action????

Its like an "evil switch" is turned on the second I send her. Then I notice somtimes when just playing she does want to engage in a tug-o-war match, which I never encourage. Should I to realease some stress-energy?

Why so agressive??????

Hope someone can help, Thanks!!!
 

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that's kinda a tough one, I'd try and break it imidiatly though, shaking isn't good, throw something that's not so comfortable to shake, a stick wraped with tie wire with some stray ends poking out, then with rope tie something that will dagle off the ends, something heavy and hard, so when she shakes it, it will hurt, it might be a little early to force fetch her, but she needs to learn not to shake stuff, I've seen dogs growl when they get close to bringing it back, but shaking is never good.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks for the responce I will see what I can do to limit the shaking.

I know that she is kinda young to be training but eversince we got her she was willing to fetch for play (Good!!) so I didn't discourage. But maybe I am expecting a little to much from her now.

What to you think of this opinion that another dog owner came up with. "Since she is young, her teething might have something to do with it"??? I thought that it was a valid point since dogs do sometimes get restless when chewing for teething???? Maybe I'm mistaking a growl for a restless whine. I don't know hopefully she will grow out of it.

Again thanks for the input. :thumbsup:
 

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Its always best to nip it in the butt before she gets too old...I'd get 'er done a.s.a.p. if I were you...you don't want her ripping apart your ducks when she goes to get 'em... :mrgreen:
 

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I just sent sully a little note on the same thing, But basically, at this stage, we would take her off of fetching for a couple of MONTHS, and work her on strict obedience. The we would go to plastic dummies, and work on the hold command. For our string, That means you hold it still, and in the middle. Ithink that at htree months, you just need to slow her down a bit. She has already shown that she wants to fetch, and this desire will not suddenly leave her over the next two months. Also, I like to work on hold in the winter, because we can do some of it inside.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Thanks muskiemac I think that this might be a great idea. I think that we could both use the break from fetching. I think that it was stressing me out "All that money on the dog and it eats the damn birds" - It would be great if I sucked at shooting she would shake it to death before I had to wring its neck. :hammering:

I know that she will come around. She is already calming down a little bit and paying better attention to my comands. Thanks for the help!!!

How do you feel about whistle comands? When should I throw them in if I decide to use them?
 

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I agree with the above advice. The dog is awful young and the retrieving portion of the training isn't that big of deal at this point. But I'm wondering why no one has said anything about the NO command. If it isn't something the dog already knows then it should be. Sounds to me like the dog is just sort of playing with this behavior. If you aren't playing at the time then a stern NO should let the dog know that what she is doing is not what you want.

Just my opinion, may be too simple minded?
 

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get a dokken dummy it helps teach them not to.
 

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Like Cabelas suggests, the Dokkens deadfowl trainers have a hard plastic head and hard feet which make shaking very uncomfortable. They also encourage proper holding position. They are a lot more expensive than rubber bumpers but one is worth it.
 

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I agree with both Harvey & Cabelas on getting a Dokken. I drilled out a golf ball, and stuck it on the end of mine, it helps me get more distance out of my throws without tearing up my hands, and if he shakes the duck it hits him in the head (it didn't take long for him to catch-on, and I didn't have to say anything).

As for the growling, I'd chalk it up to dedication, and drive. My dog will get very ansy, and excited the longer I make him wait, and lets out a little bark when I send him.
 
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