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Been hearing that we're going to hit $4.00 a gallon by summertime. That's really going to suck big time. I'm starting to reconsider about gettin back into my lease for next year. Every trip up is going to cost me $100 +. Hell, between my daughter's travel ball and commuting to work m - f, I won't be able to afford it anymore. Starting to think about puttin a camo job on the 12' aluminum boat and start hittin the delta or even going back to the refs. Yes, I've gotten spoiled to the club life, but the gas crap is going to ruin it. Just wondering what you guys think.
 

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Gas prices, have you seen the diesel price $3.80 already and I heard in the bay area it's already at $4.00. It's getting outrageous and the executives of these gas companies are just getting richer. :mad:
 

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yeah it really sucks thats one of the main reasons i dont like whister is because it cost me 100 in gas alone i would just try to find some property around you not in city limits and shoot there i personally have no problem working all day for a limit of mallards (talk to local golf course)
 

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I am not the least bit worried about gas prices! I get 36 MPG in my truck (ok wanna be truck)! :biggrin: However I am really scared about how our economy is doing. We have been studying the economy in school and things are looking really bad.... :thumbsdown: Which motivates people to save their money while they have some, therefore fewer hunters in the field, and maybe some hunters will even quit. From what I have seen so far our economy is looking similar to the 70's with the oil crisis, house market crashing, and the other various problems and issues. I have a gut feeling it is going to be a rough year for everybody, especially smaller business and companies. Fewer customers and higher prices....chain reaction. Not trying to be over dramtic, just stating some things I have learned in school.
 

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We are sitting on enough reserve all the big man has to do is cut it loose and the oil prices will drop, I have been hualing fuel for 13 yrs and I have seen alot of B-S and this is strickly B-S.
Question: Have you ever stopped and thouhgt about the cost of everything theses day's? The housing is out of control, price of food will go up, the price of fuel has gone up up and up, Hey what about our wages? How can we afford to go out and spend our money when we don't have it, and they are talking recession. :huh:
Well it's $4.00 per gallon for unleaded today folks, why don't we drill our own oil? I have my own reasons why but I might get shot stating it, if someone is worried about oil spills they should take a look at what sails into the bay every day, ok I'm starting to get pissed so I will stop here. :mad:
Have a good day. :smile:
 

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Talking about the economy, Los Banos was a disaster this past duck season with all the home foreclosures happening in the area. The Home Depot on 152 had more employees than shoppers on a given Saturday afternoon.

But you're right, I believe only the first turds of the $hit hitting the fan have flown, and it's not going to be pretty. I believe we're still in the the 1980-81 recession, which Regan pumped defense money in the 80s economy, the dot coms pumped investor money into the 90s economy, and relaxed lending regs and greedy banks pumped the re-fi/ cash-out money into the 2000s economy.

Follow Bloomberg.com for daily financial news, and the reports are frightening, such as just today:

The markets have become ``utterly unhinged,'' William O'Donnell, a UBS AG government bond strategist in Stamford, Connecticut, wrote in a note to clients today

and

``Everything is telling you the financial system is broken,'' Simon, whose Newport Beach, California-based unit of Allianz SE manages the world's largest bond fund, said in a telephone interview today. ``Everybody's in de-levering mode.''

http://bloomberg.com/apps/news?pid=2060 ... refer=bond

Anyway, $40 or $60 roundtrip gas, I'm still going duck hunting for the weekend.
 

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i filled my chevy up today and payed 116.00 at 3.60 a gallon. that tank of gas will get me to tuley,thats it, then gas for daily scouting, and another 116.00 for the way home. ive got 2 options for next year, (and staying home is not one of them) i either sell my truck, which i could sell not for enough to even cover the motor in it, and buy a desiel, or make less trips and stay longer, but as a union sheetmetal worker and dont get paid unless i work ,id be lossing a little over 200 a day. man its a no win situation!
 

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BrokenWing said:
We are sitting on enough reserve all the big man has to do is cut it loose and the oil prices will drop, I have been hualing fuel for 13 yrs and I have seen alot of B-S and this is strickly B-S.
Question: Have you ever stopped and thouhgt about the cost of everything theses day's? The housing is out of control, price of food will go up, the price of fuel has gone up up and up, Hey what about our wages? How can we afford to go out and spend our money when we don't have it, and they are talking recession. :huh:
Well it's $4.00 per gallon for unleaded today folks, why don't we drill our own oil? I have my own reasons why but I might get shot stating it, if someone is worried about oil spills they should take a look at what sails into the bay every day, ok I'm starting to get pissed so I will stop here. :mad:
Have a good day. :smile:
Well, I've got to disagree somewhat. As I see it, this is only half correct; sure we sit on huge reserves, but getting the crude is only half of the problem. Our demand for gasoline (not oil) exceeds our ability to get crude. No doubts that if we tapped into our local reserves the prices would drop, but by how much? I'm no expert on what the price would be, but our real problem becomes we cannot refine crude oil fast enough to keep up with our demand. I remember reading a TIME article back when I lived in Sac and it told of how much governmental red tape a company has to go through and how many millions (billions?) it would cost in order to build...and even then I recall it saying over 10 years. That's a hell of an investment that can be shut down at anytime for nearly any reason(s) (endangered dirt anyone?). Not to mention, with the price of fuel shooting up, who knows how long we'll be heavily dependent on petroleum?

Part of what I do like with what you said, is that it is a bunch of crap. The oil companies (err...OPEC) needs any excuse to raise the price of crude. oops, the sun went up, we need to raise it....and even the gas stations and refineries. The price of oil went up today, but that would not affect the crude that shipped yesterday, the day before that, any of the crude in transit, any of the crude being refined, and certainly none of the crude that is already at the station, but sure as hell, everyone along the way raises the price. And when oil falls, they wont lower it until the "have to."

Another gripe I have with the refineries and gas stations is diesel. It was once said before my day, diesel will never be more expensive than gasoline. As we all know, diesel is a by product after refining oil to gasoline. Even if you don't want it, is there.

So this is what gets me. I understand there is a lot of diesel consumption in the Nation--hell, I am in the trucking business. But I cannot fathom the idea that diesel is in higher than gasoline. The way I see it, there are a few different scenarios:

#1:
Diesel demand far exceeds gasoline demand:
Since we would need to refine so much more crude to get THAT much diesel the supply of gasoline would skyrocket, causing gasoline prices to plummet.

#2:
Gasoline demand far exceeds diesel demand.
Complete opposite as above. In order to keep up with the demand in gasoline, more crude needs to be refined leaving more by product of diesel. The price of gasoline goes up, but the price of diesel plummets because we have an inevitable supply of diesel.

#3:
Demand is relatively the same:
Gasoline still needs to refined, to meet demand, but now more oil needs to be refined to make up for the diesel demand. By default, this refines more gasoline so the supply increases causing prices to plummet.

I have been thinking about this **** a lot lately, and have finally had a few minutes to jot it all down to see it on paper. In the end, it's free enterprise and they're entitled to whatever we are willing to pay. The last thing we need is major government intervention. Well, I actually want to take back that last statement, a little. I went to Las Vegas last weekend and before I left I filled up at Chevron. $3.499 a gallon. I have no clue what happened to oil prices over the weekend, but if the trend continued, they increased the price. When we left on Monday in Las Vegas, the price for Chevron was 3.139 in Las Vegas. This tells me that California has an extra $.36 in taxes, not including taxes the two States share, sales tax and federal taxes. In my opinion, in this time, what the government should do is drop all gasoline taxes rather than give any sort of a redistribution of wealth through an economic stimulant tax break......

Then again....this is just one man's opinion.....

Vote Jeff Given for US President in 2020 because the decision is perfectly clear.
 

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Jeff you said you have been hauling fuel for 13 years, and have seen a lot of B-S. Can you explain or give a few examples of some B-S that takes place, that the general public would not know about because you work in the fuel bussiness...??? Just wondering how you got your ideas of it being B-S.
 

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If the USA took the Iraqi oil and started shipping it in American tankers to American refinderies for $25 per barrel, for sale in the US for $1.00/ gallon, how many days do you think it would take for world oil futures to drop to around $25/ barrel?

For those around the world who would not like us, they don't already- the H with them.

No balls, no glory.
 

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bill in san jose said:
If the USA took the Iraqi oil and started shipping it in American tankers to American refinderies for $25 per barrel, for sale in the US for $1.00/ gallon, how many days do you think it would take for world oil futures to drop to around $25/ barrel?

For those around the world who would not like us, they don't already- the H with them.

No balls, no glory.
I like that Idea, as a former Army vet, I have had the opinion that we should just surround the oil fields and shoot anyone who dares come close. Officials say we are there for political reasons, I say B.S., we are there for oil. Just take the crap, like said in an above post, nobody likes us anyhow. Just piss off all the 3rd world countries and make everyone in civilized nations much happier.

my $0.02 worth.
 

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BrokenWing said:
We are sitting on enough reserve all the big man has to do is cut it loose and the oil prices will drop, I have been hualing fuel for 13 yrs and I have seen alot of B-S and this is strickly B-S.
Question: Have you ever stopped and thouhgt about the cost of everything theses day's? The housing is out of control, price of food will go up, the price of fuel has gone up up and up, Hey what about our wages? How can we afford to go out and spend our money when we don't have it, and they are talking recession. :huh:
Well it's $4.00 per gallon for unleaded today folks, why don't we drill our own oil? I have my own reasons why but I might get shot stating it, if someone is worried about oil spills they should take a look at what sails into the bay every day, ok I'm starting to get pissed so I will stop here. :mad:
Have a good day. :smile:
one of the my friends i do a little bit of sky carp hunting with works for shell. it is his job to keep oil ships off shore until they are extremly low forcing the prices for gas to raise. he says he will have 3 to 4 ships 100 miles out just circling until they know they can get the prices to raise. the problem is the government allowed 5 major oil companys to take over all the ma and pop refineries. and you ever notice all the gas prices are at the same price if ya ask me just a little bit of corruption going on there
 

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The elite used to control salt, now they control oil.

Funny thing is that oil reserves have continued to increase since the 1970's.

The more they look, the more they find.

We will not run out of oil in your lifetime.

Iraqi oil reserves are considered to be the second largest in the world, after Saudi Arabia's. Large parts of Iraq are still virgin; its large hydrocarbon reserves are still waiting to be developed to their full potential, while most other Middle East countries are fully exploiting their reserves. Southeastern Iraq has the largest concentration of super-giants fields to be found anywhere in the world; nine fields total. Yet they were measured using very old 2-D technology.



Part of the upper Jurassic-aged Gotnia reflector, based on 1980s 2-D seismic data, they are, from left to right and top to bottom:

Ratawi; Rachi; West Qurna; North and South Rumaila (measuring over 117 kilometers long); Tuba; Zubair; Majnoon; and Nahr Umr Fields.

These fields will be found to be even larger if they are ever mapped with modern 3-D seismic technology.

Iraq's production comes from only 15 developed fields out of a potential 73 discovered fields. Iraq has the capability to reach a production plateau of six million barrels of oil per day within a very short period of time tripling its current OPEC limited production and it would jump from the number 14 producer to the number four; close behind the United States. It would then rank as the number three exporter of oil in the world trailing only Saudi Arabia and Russia. it could pass Russia with ease and challenge Saudi Arabia as an exporter or oil; if allowed.

As a comparison, Saudi Arabia the top producer in the world, produces 8.8 million barrels per day with a peak production capacity of something over 10 million barrels per day.

In just the last 12 months, there have been discoveries of new reserves in Russia, offshore China (>17 increase in reserves of 18 billion), Argentina (>5% increase in reserves of two billion), Albania (>900% increase in reserves of 200 million), and offshore of Brazil (>40% increase in reserves 11 billion). And this is all light crude, the most prized and easily refined.

Just 19 months ago, there was a major discovery in the Gulf of Mexico that slipped under the radar.

Whenever they look; they find more.

If tar sands and oil shales ever reach major commercialization, proven world oil reserves would last past your children's grandchildren and beyond.

Total world resources of oil shale are conservatively estimated at 2.6 trillion barrels, US sits on close to two trillion barrels of crude: more than all the crude than was ever produced worldwide since petroleum age began. The United States has the largest known deposits of oil shale in the world; an estimated 2,500 gigabarrels of reserves or enough to meet the current rate of U.S. demand for oil for more than 110 years. Colorado and Utah have as much oil as Saudi Arabia, Iran, Iraq, Venezuela, Nigeria, Kuwait, Libya, Angola, Algeria, Indonesia, Qatar and the United Arab Emirates combined when oil shales are considered. The Bureau of Land Management owns about 80% of the oil shale acreage in Colorado, there is no investment play for any company that commercializes the extraction process.

It was estimated in 1998, when prices for light sweet crude were $14 to $15 per barrel, that oil from shale could be produced in commercial quantities for $30 to $40 per barrel based on a 20% return on equity. Shell estimated as recently as June, 2007 it could extract oil from Colorado shale for $30 a barrel, less than half the price of the benchmark New York futures of $66 at the time. And the product Shell would produce would require no heavy refining; making the venture that much more lucrative.

Canada's tar sands have a break even point at $33 per barrel of light crude in 2008 dollars. The U.S. has another 30 billion barrels in tar sands reserves mostly in Utah.



Then there is synthetic oil that can be produced from coal at the rate of one barrel per ton of coal at a break even point of $30 per barrel. Modern plants can produce 1.3 barrels of oil per ton of coal lowering the break even cost even further. The Fischer-Tropsch method can produce as much as 1.5 barrels of diesel fuel per one ton of coal at the cost of $35 per barrel in 2005 dollars.

At the end of 2006 the recoverable world coal reserves amounted around 909 gigatonnes; up from the 2005 reserves of 847.5 gigatonnes. So just like petroleum reserves, coal reserves continue to increase as exploration continues.

The U.S. has the world's largest reserves of coal estimated at 27.1% of the world's coal reserves or a very conservative figure of 246.6 gigatonnes or enough coal to produce 246 billion barrels of oil. Some estimate the U.S. total at 29% of the world's recoverable reserves. Montana has 25% of the U.S. reserves of coal.

Thermal depolymerization can make very light oil equivalent to number two heating oil from offal: animal guts from slaughter houses. Chickens, turkeys, cows; it doesn't matter.

The break even cost is about $15 per barrel or less with one ton of animal parts producing three barrels of number two heating oil that needs no refining. It was estimated in 1996 that the U.S. produced 13.2 million tons of animal offal for the year or the equivalent of at least 31 million barrels of number two oil which is how much oil our number ten producing state, Montana, produces every year in crude that still needs to be refined.

Three barrels of number two oil is equivalent to four barrels of crude; meaning the 31 million barrels of oil equivalent from offal is really the equal to 41 million barrels of crude which would make animal offal the eighth largest oil producing state in the U.S.; just behind Wyoming and well ahead of Kansas.

Thermal depolymerization can make oil from many other biological sources as well.

Peak Oil is a myth; a very lucrative myth.
 
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