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Two resources, I think Entry Express being the better. Also EE shows all of the hunt test schedules across the US.

 

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That’s a workable range. I haven’t been in the puppy market in a bit, and have no idea if there an inflationary hit on them like everything else but typically the $1,000 range is where you start getting what people on here would see as a good bloodline and real health certifications.
It may have gone up more than I realize but that is probably the "pet market" where buyers are naive and Covid lock downs sent the "need a pet" craze forward. I looked at the breeder I bought the Chocolate from who is probably not far from the OP. They do breed some nice Labs but the working dogs are more serviceable gundogs and HT quality pedigrees and not trial dogs.

Anyway...current litters are $2400-$2600 w/limited registration. I paid $900.00 back in '05.
 

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I’m looking at getting a golden retriever for waterfowl hunting any tips or anything?
Tip # 1- Don't get a Golden for your first dog, just...don't.
Am training one up as we speak, beautiful dog but as mentioned-
More than normal maintenance, (particularly any Upland), but if you're just in water after a short boat ride and no stickers to get in that coat , not so bad.
Secondly-
Have seen several Goldens that have definately proven themselves in field work, however what I've noticed is that a lot of them are considerably older than say- a Lab would be to get to the same level.
Although this is the first one I've worked with to speak of, and after having spoken with a couple pro trainers, and other Golden owners, these dogs really don't like a whole lot of pressure, and not talking about only collar pressure either. We're looking for our junior this fall, but truthfully, we should have been there 2 mos. ago but I had to tip toe around, play a little patty cakes and all that crap with a dog that is on the sensitive side.


Then there's the cold water issue.

Tip #2- Just get a freakin' Lab from a good responsible breeding with credible health certs and call it a day.
You won't regret it.
 

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You must have a bilge pump. I've hunted from a boat with a really fine old style golden that's only real flaw was retrieving a bucket of water with each bird.
Rick we don't worry about bilge pumps or water in the boat-
As long as the stuff inside doesn't leak to the outside we're "Golden", (no punn) 😉 🙂
Rick the little gal I've got is happy to run out a couple football fields and return with a hand delivery, loves retrieving , birds and water, but it was getting past the normal pressures in training to get some understanding and cooperation for some basic tasks. She really did present her own set of unique challenges in terms of the best approach to teach fundamentals.
Know a lot of dogs are forgiving , but do know if I had the luxury of a choice of a dog, I would want a dog that gives me the best shot (trainability- wise) as a trainer for my very first dog to train.
Hey what's an "Old style Golden"?
 

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Hey what's an "Old style Golden"?
The field bred goldens I've known in recent years/decades have been miniatures of the larger, more setter-like goldens that once seemed common. Not show "fluffies" but marsh mops, none the less. Just failed to find a pic of an old partner's that holds, "best I've known" status for the breed, but will post it if I do.
 

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You must have a bilge pump. I've hunted from a boat with a really fine old style golden that's only real flaw was retrieving a bucket of water with each bird.
The field bred goldens I've known in recent years/decades have been miniatures of the larger, more setter-like goldens that once seemed common. Not show "fluffies" but marsh mops, none the less. Just failed to find a pic of an old partner's that holds, "best I've known" status for the breed, but will post it if I do.
Gotcha' Rick.
Recollect the Goldens you're talking about, and a lot Goldens that I've seen lately are notably larger. One I've got here is smaller than I thought she'd be at 11mos. There's others (particularly a male down the road), that dwarf this dog in size.
 

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I'd think golden size largely "show," "pet," or "field" breeding related. Just know that the goldens I've seen serious hunt testers running the past couple or three decades have been little rips.
 

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I'd think golden size largely "show," "pet," or "field" breeding related. Just know that the goldens I've seen serious hunt testers running the past couple or three decades have been little rips.
If I can figure out how to post a vid or pic on here I'll surely do it, but I'm just too silly to figure it out.
Rick, not saying this because I own this dog but tell ya' -
This little girl when released leaves the line after a mark like she's been shot out of a cannon, am really proud of her.
 

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If I can figure out how to post a vid or pic on here I'll surely do it, but I'm just too silly to figure it out.
Rick, not saying this because I own this dog but tell ya' -
This little girl when released leaves the line after a mark like she's been shot out of a cannon, am really proud of her.
Swamp - the ones I've seen at the trial level have all been like Rick described (and as you appear to have) being smaller and more slightly built. Tough little dogs. You'll never see a flatcoat referred to as a "little rip". :ROFLMAO:
 

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I think the size thing all started changing in the late 70's. The show people ruined Golden's. Big, lumbering beasts that if you yelled no would roll over an pee themselves and were terrified of game birds. The old 70 collar was very difficult to train one with. Then they started breeding for toughness. The dog's became smaller, faster, tougher and bit. The old saying was "You could tell a golden trainer by the scars on his arms". A Lab or Chessie bit the whip; the Golden bit you. We all carried Kangaroo hide shot loaded quirts in those days. Then the new ones came along. Mike Lardy's dad was one breeder of them. I had a little gal named Muffin. Loved her. She was like a rocket ship on a rail. Couldn't have weighed 45 pounds wet, but I loved her. She was the best Golden I ever trained, became an All Age dog I think, and still had her on my truck when I retired from training. She was a dog anyone would love.
 

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Swamp - the ones I've seen at the trial level have all been like Rick described (and as you appear to have) being smaller and more slightly built. Tough little dogs. You'll never see a flatcoat referred to as a "little rip". :ROFLMAO:
Too funny HNTFSH 😄
Reckon I've had close to a dozen personal dogs in my life and have always kept retrieving as fun as the dog would want it to be, and really made more of a conscious effort with this one to keep it even more fun.
Have never had a dog jump up , spin in circles , do somersaults at the sight of a bumper like this lil gal , eventually had to reluctantly teach DOWN damnit! , to keep from having to get a transfusion and the end of a training session 😄
Fun to see the eagerness.
Something of interest-
Almost lost the dog she swallowed one of the grandkids little toys, (dunno' what it was) and it messed her up. Wound up in the emergency vet overnight for a day and a half.
Then my shoulder gave out in the middle of CC her and a short laundry list of other little setbacks including the hot as hell weather this summer.
She hasn't been pressure conditioned yet going to begin this weekend.
 

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I think the size thing all started changing in the late 70's. The show people ruined Golden's. Big, lumbering beasts that if you yelled no would roll over an pee themselves and were terrified of game birds. The old 70 collar was very difficult to train one with. Then they started breeding for toughness. The dog's became smaller, faster, tougher and bit. The old saying was "You could tell a golden trainer by the scars on his arms". A Lab or Chessie bit the whip; the Golden bit you. We all carried Kangaroo hide shot loaded quirts in those days. Then the new ones came along. Mike Lardy's dad was one breeder of them. I had a little gal named Muffin. Loved her. She was like a rocket ship on a rail. Couldn't have weighed 45 pounds wet, but I loved her. She was the best Golden I ever trained, became an All Age dog I think, and still had her on my truck when I retired from training. She was a dog anyone would love.
Gone-
I think mine tops the scale at #43 -

With one of the large Milk Bones in her mouth 😁
 

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I don't buy the notion that show, pet or whatever people ever ruined a hunting breed. Only lack of interest from hunters can do that. Witness the Labrador retriever: bazillions of show and pet breeders cranking them out, yet those interested in their field abilities have kept Labs still possessing strong field aptitudes more readily found than than most sporting breeds without significant show or pet interest.
 

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I don't buy the notion that show, pet or whatever people ever ruined a hunting breed. Only lack of interest from hunters can do that. Witness the Labrador retriever: bazillions of show and pet breeders cranking them out, yet those interested in their field abilities have kept Labs still possessing strong field aptitudes more readily found than than most sporting breeds without significant show or pet interest.
I always figured a good question for any breeder, show, field or pet was: "What was the purpose of this breeding, what did you work to accomplish".

The answer or non-answer was always telling. I don't think Chocolate Labs are stupid, I think they were bred for being brown and that was popular at one point. Brown and only brown.
 

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It’s true that there was never the interest in The golden retriever, that there was in the other breeds. And why should there be? They were big, slow, lumbering dogs, the pretty boys of the retriever world. If you hunted out of the boat, you had to install a second bilge pump just to keep the water out of it. Then there was the mouth problem. They were so loose mouth that it was difficult to get them to retrieve a bird without dropping it multiple times on the way in. The show people took them, and made them worse. They made them bigger, slower, with longer silky hair hair and an aversion to cold water and birds. In many ways, there are fate paralleled that of the Irish setter. Today, to get a decent Irish setter, you have to buy a red setter. I don’t think there are any true Irish setters left that hard, unless they are in Ireland. The popularity of the Labrador retriever with hunters, is what saved the labrador retriever from the fate of the golden retriever. And of course, their looks couldn’t match that of the golden retriever. The golden has always been the pretty boy of the retrieving breeds. Well, of course, except for the Chesapeake bay retriever.
 
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