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You have to consider the hunting enviroment your lab is going to be exposed to. They aren't sent out to range wide and basically run their own hunt as a pointer would, a labs life in the field is destined to be in close quarters with their hunter until it is time for them to go to work even when hunting upland they should be working close to you and be ready to take directions. You also should remember that the whole breed was designed to work in close proximity to people. I mean they were bred to work off of small tender boats bringing in fishing nets in the north atlantic. That requires a very compliant dog, I'd think !
So, I guess what I'm saying is that you and your dog need to be able to read each other and have a connection.The easiest way for this to happen is by sharing living space. Yes,the puppy stage is a nightmare. But,the rewards are numerous.You'll be training your pup without either own of you being aware that it's a training session. For the record ,I have 3 labs. I tried the kennel thing and it was not benefical at all. So,now, all 3 labs are house dogs. :thumbsup:
 

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Oh,I agree we crate . each dog has his own crate in our utility room which is also where their food/water are kept. The only dog not crated is the adult male(the other 2 are 7 mo. old pups). He has his own beds in the living room and in my daughters room. But you got the gist of what I meant.
 

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CG,
I believe that is typical behavior for a female lab.They may not camp out beside your bed like a male will but they will periodically check in . I bet that can get annoying though,in the middle of the night especially.
 
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