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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
GSP - well that comment about hunters not being able to tell what species of ducks fly by we, are going to prove them wrong. I will start off easy and we will work our way up and then you can print the whole thread and send it to these no it alls :thumbsup: I will post new ones each day for everyone to see and tell what they think (or should i say know) it is.

 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Just go ahead there MALLARDhunter. :thumbsup: When its right I will just post a new one up. So we will give that one to ya. :salude:

Mallard Anas platyrhynchos

Length: 15-16 inches Wingspan: 36 inches
Large dabbling duck
Blue speculum with white bar along both leading and trailing edges
Silvery-white wing linings

Juvenile similar to adult female
In the southwestern United States the "Mexican Duck", formerly a separate species, has both sexes similar to the female Mallard

Adult male alternate:
Alternate plumage worn from fall through early summer
Gray back
Yellow bill
Green head
White ring around neck
Chestnut breast
Gray flanks and upperwing coverts
Black undertail coverts contrast with white tail

Adult male basic:
Similar to adult female, but usually with chestnut breast and an unmarked yellowish bill

Adult female:
Orange bill with black central patch
Pale brown face
Dark cap and eye line
Mottled brown and tan plumage

Similar species:
Adult male in alternate plumage is unmistakable. Females, immature and eclipse-plumage males could be confused with Black Ducks, Gadwalls and Mottled Ducks, but note the blue speculum with white borders on both sides. Gadwalls are also distinctive in their steeper forehead, gray bill with orange edges and white belly patch. Hybrid Mallard x Black Ducks are often seen and are darker than Mallards, with a more purple speculum bordered by white on one or both edges and usually show some traces of the Mallard plumage.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Ok here is the next one



Northern pintail Anas acuta

Length: 18.5 inches Wingspan: 35 inches
Medium-sized dabbling duck with very long neck, small head and attenuated rear

Juvenile similar to adult female

Adult male alternate:
Alternate plumage worn from fall through early summer
Pale gray bill with black stripe down center
Dark brown head White neck, breast and belly with white finger extending up back of neck to rear part of face Gray flanks and back with black centers to back feathers Whitish patch at rear portion of flanks bordering undertail coverts Black undertail coverts Long, black central tail feathers
Green speculum with white rear border and chestnut forward border

Adult male basic:
Similar to adult female but retains green speculum

Adult female:
Gray bill
Tan head and neck
Mottled tan and dark brown back and body plumage, paler on belly
Brown speculum with white rear border

Similar species:
Adult male unmistakable in alternate plumage. Females, immature and eclipse-plumage males are similar to many other female ducks but have a distinctive shape: very long-necked, small-headed and pointed-tailed. Note also female's brown speculum bordered at the rear by white.
 

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First Pic is of a Drake and Hen Shovelor

Second one is of a Drake and Hen Ole Squaw.

:mrgreen:

There Take that you Veggie Eaters :mrgreen:

Incase they Believe me, they may want to look below!
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First is A Drake and Hen "Greenhead" But the Veggie Eaters would not know them as that, so we have to say Mallards!

Second is a Drake and Hen "Bull Sprig" Or "Sprig" The Veggie eaters would not know them as that also so we have to say Pintails

I'm betting they Do not even know what a Drake and a Hen is or even a Pintail! :mrgreen:
 

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I don't know what you call them, but there haven't been near enough of them in Arkansas the last 4 seasons.

yeller
:toofunny:
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·


Average length: M 16", F 14"

Average weight: M 1.0 lbs., F 0.8 lbs.

Breeding: Blue-winged teal breed primarily in the northern prairies and parklands of central North America. Their relative abundance generally increases from west to east and north to south within the prairie pothole region. Nesting habitat includes wetland areas within grasslands, such as shallow marshes, sloughs, flooded ditches, and temporary ponds. Females change breeding sites from year to year in response to changing wetland conditions and lay an average of 10 eggs.
Migrating and Wintering: Blue-winged teal are generally the first ducks south in the fall and the last north in the spring. They migrate from the prairie pothole region to wintering areas in Florida, the Caribbean Islands, the Gulf Coast of Texas and Louisiana, Mexico, and Central and South America. Wintering habitats are diverse, including mangrove swamps, fresh and brackish estuaries, and shallow wetlands. In the USA, the highest winter densities occur in southern Texas and peninsular Florida. Blue-winged teal are common in winter from Central America, the Caribbean and South America south to Peru and northeastern Brazil. They also stay regularly in small numbers in the Galapagos Islands, and are vagrants to Chile, southeastern Brazil, Uruguay and Argentina. (Scott and Carbonell, 1986)

Population: The 2001 breeding population survey for blue-winged teal was 5.8 million birds. This is a 23% decrease from last year's record estimate of 7.4 million, but above the North American Waterfowl Management Plan (NAWMP) goal of 4.7 million. Blue-winged teal have the highest annual mortality rate (reaching 65%) of all the dabbling ducks, possibly as a result of hunting and long over-ocean migration.

Food habits: Blue-winged teal dabble to feed on vegetative parts of aquatic plants (algae, duckweeds, pondweeds, etc.), seeds (sedges, pondweeds, grasses, etc.), and large amounts of aquatic invertebrates found in shallowly flooded wetlands.

Description: Male blue-winged teal have a slate gray head and neck, a black edged white crescent in front of the eyes and a blackish crown. The breast and sides are tan with dark brown speckles and there is a white spot on the side of the rump. Most of the upper wing coverts are blue-gray, the secondaries form an iridescent green speculum, and the underwing is whitish. The bill is black and the legs and feet are yellowish to orange. The male has a thin whistled tsee tsee uttered both in flight and when on water. Female blue-winged teal have a brownish-gray head with a darker crown and eye-stripe. The breast and sides are brown, the upper parts are olive brown, and the upper wing coverts are bluish, but less vibrant than the drake. The bill is gray-black and the legs and feet are dull yellow-brown. The female has a high-pitched squeak.
 

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those are decoys....you can buy them in cabelas or bass proshops catalog...
i've seen lots of them...

some people use them for decorations in their yards....

i even own a few myself.....each fall and winter i take them swimming .... i make sure they don't swim away so i tie weights on to them....

i take my gun with me only for protection....you never know what kind of nut you'll run into in the woods or swamp....

has anyone else ever done this?????
 
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