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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am looking to purchase a new digital camera for mostly outdoor photos. I do not want to spend to much but would like something decent. I found a Canon digital Rebel XTi that includes 2 lenses an EF 75-300 mm and an F/4-5.6 III zoom lens for around $830.00. I know next to nothing about camera lenses and have never owned an SLR camera before. I would like to be able to take pictures of birds in flight and from distances of around 100 yards or so and have them come out somewhat clear. So any help as far as if this setup would be good for the price and for outdoor and action photos would be helpful.
 

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quacker, I have the set up you are looking at and love it. The 75-300mm lens leaves alot to be desired for the long shots, images of ducks at 100 yards are not going to be great, the optics just aren't good enough in that lens IMO. That said it does take great pictures for the price. Here are some ducks at 60-100 yards off


A better lens would produce a much higher quality image but you will spend over $1000 on the lens alone. The camera is pretty basic compared to the higher end canons but it is still a huge leap from the point and shoot and a great way to get into photagraphy without breaking the bank. These pics were taken at iso 100 on a slightly overcast day. Blue sky days give a little better image, below is a couple of pics from last summer with a sigma 10-20 ex lens, a good wide angle is nice to have as well as the telephoto



If you have anymore questions let me know
John
 

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in a word: Yes.

Best thing you can do is that camera - as your skill develops, you can add lenses or switch out the body. It has the option to run fully automatic or fully manual or varying degrees (Aperture Priority, Shutter Priority).
If you feel rusty on the use of SLRs you can figure it out as you go along, or you could look into a photo class through a community education program or nearby college.
the lens package seems real good. You can also add a teleconverter later on and push your distance a little bit. Make sure you get a tripod or monopod too - its very helpful on the long shots.
-Erik
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thank you for the input on this system, also you both sound like you have this camera how well will this hold up in the weather rain snow and sleet. I am not saying I want to dunk it in the water but I know alot of the times I am going to be out there it is not going to be all sunshine and I would hate to spend this kind of money just to find out that I cant use the thing when I am out there. Also can you recomend a good wide angle and telephoto lense that I can invest in later for better shots. Thank you again like I said I am new to this.
 

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The camera and lenses it comes with in the kit are not weather resistant. When we take the camera hunting we don't take it out of the car if it looks like rain, it is hard to get real good pic's on dark overcast days anyway. When we do take it we have a waterproof bag we put the camera case in. I don't take any chances with moisture, I won't even use it in a drizzle. I have seen guys make a rain shield by gluing a waterproof piece of material to a clear lens cover as a kind of veil to put over you when it is raining but I choose to be more cautious. The professional bodies and lenses are more weather resistant but are very expensive.

Lenses, There are as many opinions on lenses as there is shotguns. the best thing I can recomend is to buy your camera locally from a camera shop even if it is a little more expensive and spend a couple hours trying different lenses to see what you think you need. I have both the lenses your looking at plus this one:
http://www.sigma-photo.com/lenses/lense ... avigator=6
It is a great wide angle with really good optics. I was hesitant to buy a non-canon lens but this was half the cost of the comparable canon L series lens. I feel the image quality is not noticeable. As for the telephoto lens If I were going to do it over I would have skipped the 75-300 ef and gotten this:
http://www.usa.canon.com/consumer/contr ... delid=7344
If you are on a tight budget this is way to much, that is why I didn't get it when I bought the camera, If I would have known that 1 year after buying the setup I was going to have taken over 7000 images and enjoy hunting with the camera as much as a shotgun I would have found the money.

Have you used an slr camera before? If you haven't I would check out a photography class through a local college or camera store. The camera will function well as a fully automatic point and shoot but you will have alot more fun and get better images if you understand the basics of depth of field, composition (rule of thirds), aperature and speed settings, iso, speed etc.

Good luck with it and let me know if there is any other way I can help.
John
 

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http://www.waterproofcases.net/slrcamera.html

http://www.calumetphoto.com/item/KV5005/?a=CA01&t=PG01

There are two options for "waterproofing" your camera. Like John above, I don't generally have my camera out during a rain. You CAN take good pictures, but compensating for the loss of decent range in the rain makes shooting less than ideal.

The most important thing I use with my SLR is a pelican case - not cheap but well worth the investment since its waterproof, shockproof and floats.
I have flung my Pelican while falling from a moving skateboard, had it kicked, dropped, banged and used as a table or chair. I dragged it half way around the world and over thousands of miles camping and canoeing.



I've included mine here for reference. I only carry a wide angle and a telephoto, and what's more I am sort of a budget photographer. I shoot a Canon Elan7 SLR - not digital. I am very familiar with the operation, and if money allowed right now I would step in to a Rebel XTi - but for now It's film SLR and digital point and shoot for me.
Being budget, I don't shoot as nice of glass as some people do, so I generally shoot Tamron lenses - I have to say I have been very happy with the quality.

Hope this helps you out some more.
-Erik
 

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Quacker Tracker NY said:
Thank you for the input guys, just one more question I know its a little more but do you think that the Canon EOS 40D would be a better purchase as far as durability in the weather goes.
Not as far as weatherproofing - but its a darn good camera.
-Erik
 

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goosedown01 said:
I'm getting ready to buy the Canon xti also.

I've been looking at this lens: Canon EF 70-300mm f/4-5.6 IS USM

Is the lens above worth the extra cost over the Canon EF 75-300mm f/4.0-5.6 III USM
I've shortened the original post for you there goosedown - The thing about lenses is you get what you pay for, tand the second lens is a lot nicer glass. It is more important in the end to have high quality lenses than it is to have a super high quality body. Granted, a good body is still important, but the technology in bodies is changing yearly, lens quality does not make the leaps and bounds in technology that bodies seem to be making.
-Erik
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
I called Canon the other day and asked their tech reps about having any of these cameras out in the weather. As usual I was told although it is not recommended to expose them to the weather. The individual I spoke with explained that as long as you take the proper measures a small amount of moisture on the body will not hurt the camera. The person was fairly confident that if you are just taking the thing out, taking the picture and then putting it back again it should not be a problem.
 

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I don't know much about the cannon EOS's but have you considered the nikon d series cameras.

I have a D70 and have taken lots of outdoor photos with it and it hasn't faltered. it has stood up to several excursions around in the snow and weather, and even stood up to football sidelines in sub-zero temperatures.
granted i havn't gone shopping for camera bodies in a long time but as far as i can remember the nikon d series had a more rugged body than the cannon's. (from a feel standpoint) it's a little bigger and fit my hand better than the cannon.
the lens lines are just as competitive and most of them come bundled in the same package as you are looking at

as far as quality goes i can't agree more with the guys before me YOU GET WHAT YOU PAY FOR IN LENSES
I shoot with a nikor 70-200 f2.8 vr lens that was around 2000 and i love it, best investment i ever made in camera terms. Pictures are flawless.
however sigma and other companies produce lenses that fairly match in quality for far less and several reviewers say they cant see a difference.

I don't know if your set on the cannon, but if you feel like it check out the Nikons, i love mine and highly reccommend it!

Either way you go remember to spend the most money on the lens and you'll be happier with your pictures.

good luck with your choice.
 
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