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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm trying to teach my new pup to heel, but he won't quit playing with the leash long enough to get anything done. He will sit and obey a few other commands at other times, but as soon as I get the leash on him all he wants to do is play with it. I've tried leaving it on while he is just playing hoping that he will get used to it. It works for a while but as soon as I pick it up, he starts back chewing on it. Any suggestions will be greatly appreciated. :help:
 

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Mine did that when we started I rolled it all up in hand and held on to, well what I used her choke coller. There was nothing to play with then while we walked around the yard. Then I gradually let it drop down after time and she knew what we were there for and it was not to play.
 

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It sounds from your post that you have a very young pup. how old is the dog? A pups attention span is about 3min--If your pup is younger than 6-7mo of age you are starting the heeling to young. At 6 to 7mo of age a dog should know how to walk on a leash without grabbing the leash---if your dog is past that age then begin in smaller steps.

First--getting used to the leash

2nd--not bitting the leash or lagging behind is tolerated

3rd--should be healing on a leash

4th--healing off the leash

Post the age of the pup and we might be able to help you further. :thumbsup:
 

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SC has a good idea about rolling it up in your hand. i also recommend a leash that is just long enough for you to work with like gsp stated. you can also hold slight tension on the leash and keep it directly behind the dogs head while she is at heel. it may take a few minutes but she'll eventually realize she can't reach it without moving from heel and give up. make sure not to let her break heel when doing this. hth!
 

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How old is your dog? Here is a way to teach heel very quickly. Get a 4ft lead and a prong/pinch collar. Not a choke colar. Take a grinder and sharpen the points of the prong colar a little bit, not too much. You should be able to put it on your hand and as you pull it should lightly scratch your skin.

Put that on the pup and walk him at your side saying heel, as he heels LOTS of praise. As he gets out or start playing, gently pull on the lead and when he heels again LOTS of praise. As he starts to catch on say heel and if he doesn't listen, pull the leash slightly. Teaching puppies to heel requires lots and lots of practice, but is easiest when taught to a young puppy. The most important thing is to be able to enforce every command. If you try just once to make him heel off leash and cannot enforce it, you are stepping backward. When you give a command, you MUST be able to make the dog do it. Keep him on a lead all the time while teaching any command. This builds a mental picture in the pups head that he has to listen to you, there is no other option.

Mike
 

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98,

i like the meat of your post but not sure why you would sharpen the pinchers on the collar? wouldn't this cause it to break the skin easier? i agree 100% about being to reinforce commands and with repitition. just curious...
 

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Shrp- No, it doesn't break the skin of the dog. Try it on your arm first and remember you don't have fur. Most prong colars come rounded at the tips, they used to come straight edged. By sharpening it you actually get a faster response and cause less pain to the dog. I know it sounds bad, but if you don't believe me try it. The dog will react faster and you just barely pull on the lead and it gets a reaction. I see too many people choking dogs and using too much force when trying to train. Short, fast, consistant corrections works better.

Give it a try sometime, it really is a night and day difference by using a sharpened prong colar. You would be suprised how many trainers use them. They probably don't come from the manufacturer like that because some idiot would wrench on his dog and cause harm.

Also- with any choke or prong colar, remove this off your dog as soon as you are done. NEVER ever let your dog out of your site with these colars on. I almost lost my pup when she was 4 months by having a choke colar on her. I left for 15 minutes, I came back and my pup was laying on the deck and the loop on the colar had fell down through the crack and my pup was head down to the deck almost choking. I see a lot of guys that use choke colars as normal colars, they are dangerous. They are only for training, if you are not with your dog or there is no leash on them, take any prong or choke colar off.

Mike
 

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98ramtough said:
Shrp- No, it doesn't break the skin of the dog. Try it on your arm first and remember you don't have fur. Most prong colars come rounded at the tips, they used to come straight edged. By sharpening it you actually get a faster response and cause less pain to the dog. I know it sounds bad, but if you don't believe me try it. The dog will react faster and you just barely pull on the lead and it gets a reaction. I see too many people choking dogs and using too much force when trying to train. Short, fast, consistant corrections works better.

Give it a try sometime, it really is a night and day difference by using a sharpened prong colar. You would be suprised how many trainers use them. They probably don't come from the manufacturer like that because some idiot would wrench on his dog and cause harm.

Also- with any choke or prong colar, remove this off your dog as soon as you are done. NEVER ever let your dog out of your site with these colars on. I almost lost my pup when she was 4 months by having a choke colar on her. I left for 15 minutes, I came back and my pup was laying on the deck and the loop on the colar had fell down through the crack and my pup was head down to the deck almost choking. I see a lot of guys that use choke colars as normal colars, they are dangerous. They are only for training, if you are not with your dog or there is no leash on them, take any prong or choke colar off.

Mike
ok. i gotcha. i actually had to use a pinch collar on my lab because he would try and pull my wife's arm out of the socket if another dog came around when she would walk him around the block. i never thought to sharpen it though. i guess i think of the tremendous pressure he would put on the collar the first couple of times he pulled with it on. it only took him once or twice though. 8 years later, he still won't pull a leash. it doesn't matter who is holding it.

i can see where it would be a lot less severe than i originally thought with small quick corrections. i hate seeing people jerk a dog around by a lead too.

thanks for the insight. :thumbsup:
 

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no problem shrp. When a pro told me to sharpen it my first reaction was that it would cut into the dogs neck. I was hesitant. After I walked the dog for 5 minutes with the improved colar I was kicking myself for not doing it from day1.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Thanks for the help. I think that I should probably wait a little on the heeling after reading your advise, because he is only 11wks old. He has been doing well with everything else, though. I think that I am just a little anxious to get things started because this is my first real hunting dog and he has been doing so well. Thanks again. :thumbsup:
 

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Yeah 11 weeks is to young really to get IMO to try and get alot out of um for heeling. Good luck with it, let us know how its going down the road. :thumbsup:
 

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11 weeks old is a GREAT time to START teaching the heel command, but you have to have tons of patience. When the pup wants to play, let it play, but not with the leash. Now is also a good time to teach NO. If the pup wants to chew on the leash just give a stern NO. Don't yell, just be stern. If the pup persists, grab it around the snout and give another stern NO. It takes TIME with both. HEEL is probably the toughest to teach, you just have to stick with it.

IMO... Waiting until pup is 6 or 7 months old is wasting valuable time. If you stick with it, you can have the dog heeling like a champ by six months.

Just my opinion...
 

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Good point Steve. Anytime is a great time to start training. Just keep it short and have patience.

SteveInTN said:
11 weeks old is a GREAT time to START teaching the heel command, but you have to have tons of patience. When the pup wants to play, let it play, but not with the leash. Now is also a good time to teach NO. If the pup wants to chew on the leash just give a stern NO. Don't yell, just be stern. If the pup persists, grab it around the snout and give another stern NO. It takes TIME with both. HEEL is probably the toughest to teach, you just have to stick with it.

IMO... Waiting until pup is 6 or 7 months old is wasting valuable time. If you stick with it, you can have the dog heeling like a champ by six months.

Just my opinion...
 

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i don't think 11 weeks is too young. Steve and 98 are right about the patience though. as a rule of thumb, the younger you try and teach something the more patience you have to have.
 
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