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I have been reloading lead for a while and want to reload steel. What do y'all think is the best; straight same size steel, stack loads where shot sizes are different, tss steel mix, bismuth steel mix? I have the 5th lyman book, and am going to buy the PR manual and status of steel so I would prefer not getting told to buy this manual or something like that. Can y'all put some of y'alls best 2.75" or 3" loads down there.
 

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Without tested recipes ( like in most manuals ) the liability of giving someone a recipe , can be not wise !
Without manuals to educate you what a reasonable recipe is , there's nothing to fall back on , when a load
Blows-up in your face blinding you , maiming your hands along with destroying your gun .

Now wouldn't you rather have a idea , what's your asking ?
The research is fun , try it ?
 

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I tend to go with loads in the 1400 range +/- 50 fps. The two 12 ga loads are basically RSI loads (but I don't recall the numbers).
3" rem, win209, 35 g steel, 1-1/4 oz of shot. I'll also use the ched hull and primer. And the 3" fed .090 hull with #BBB steel.

2-3/4" ched/fio/rio/fed etc., ched cx2000, 32-34 g steel, csd118, 1-1/8 oz of shot. This will work with just about any steel shotcup.
 

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Between this site, and the other duck hunting forum, there’s tons of tested load data with available wads and Steel powder. It may take a few hours to sort through, but it’s all pretty well documented. The HG Load is referenced over and over. Good working pressure and speed, duplexed options with TSS and HTL.
 

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Lets not forget its also illegal to share a lot of the recipes, copyright material. BPI sent a letter to one of the Facebook groups last year warning them to not allow it anymore or legal action would be taken.
 

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For 10 to 45 yard shots you can't beat cheap standard steel to hunt ducks.
The 13 g/cc specialty pellets will add 20 yards or more but hit your wallet also.
The 18 g/cc TSS pellets make the little .410 a duck/turkey shotgun if you have enough money.
 

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For 10 to 45 yard shots you can't beat cheap standard steel to hunt ducks.
The 13 g/cc specialty pellets will add 20 yards or more but hit your wallet also.
The 18 g/cc TSS pellets make the little .410 a duck/turkey shotgun if you have enough money.
Hi Sage , was thinking about you and the Washoe as our Grasslands is drying up .
Bismuth buffered out of my Mod 12 3" is still hanging in there !
 

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Steel "does the job" provided you can get enough pellets I the target. With steel I don't get the one shot kills I did when lead was allowed. As I get into bismuth and tungsten that seems to be coming back. Pattern density is one of the advantages of tungsten. Im finding I can drop more birds dead with an 11/16 oz load of #6 tungsten (middle of the road density) in the 28 ga than a 1 oz load of #2s out of my 20 ga.I'm getting better pattern density plus better energy. And considering the huge price jump in commercial loads if you handload tungsten its not that more than the higher end steel. Im finding that not having to use extra shells for finishing shots brings the cost (per hunt) even closer
 

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I suppose those who choose to spend a little extra on Tungsten shot have their reasons , especially for small
bore loads but I still have not came to that when loading Steel Shot . I say that because , within steel shot loads
ability , its 7.8 g/cc provides more pellets in the payload , that are harder so , with proper velocity , they stay together
in the pattern longer and hit the target with more pellets for the same size shot . Oh I agree , steel doesn't
retain the energy like HTL pellets but within normal shooting distances ( inside 45 yards ) steel shot works
just fine , for me !
Now with loading my 28 or 20 ga to compete with larger bored guns in the marsh , Tungsten does even the
playing field some as with smaller pellet sizes , with more or the same energy , they do offer more pattern
density in those loads . It just takes ones ability to put them on target , to justify their cost .

Pro's and Con's = whatever works for you for the conditions you hunt in ?
 

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Steel "does the job" provided you can get enough pellets I the target. With steel I don't get the one shot kills I did when lead was allowed. As I get into bismuth and tungsten that seems to be coming back. Pattern density is one of the advantages of tungsten. Im finding I can drop more birds dead with an 11/16 oz load of #6 tungsten (middle of the road density) in the 28 ga than a 1 oz load of #2s out of my 20 ga.I'm getting better pattern density plus better energy. And considering the huge price jump in commercial loads if you handload tungsten its not that more than the higher end steel. Im finding that not having to use extra shells for finishing shots brings the cost (per hunt) even closer
What load data are you using for 28gauge 1.0625oz of tungsten? I’m assuming tss?
 
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