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As some of you know from some of my other posts I will be looking for a new lab pup soon. My 13 yr old lab will need to be put down soon due to cancer. I have been looking at breeders, pedigrees, etc. and have narrowed the search down to a couple of places.

How or what is your procedure when picking up a dog? I am looking for a duck hunting lab that is mellow and good with the kids. I got very lucky when I picked out my last dog with no experience other than we picked him out of the group because he was the only one to pay attention to a phesant wing on a string and stayed focused. What other tricks of the trade will increase my chances of picking the right dog from a litter on pick up day?

Thanks in advance,
Jeff
jduck1 :thumbsup:
 

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when I picked out my pup I insisted on seeing the parents and the pedigree. I wanted parents that hunt and have hunters in the bloodline. when I went to pick out my pup from the breeder he happened to shoot a limit of ducks that morning. So I took all the pups over to the dead birds and he was the only one that showed any intrest in the birds out of the 6 pups that were there. In my opinion I think that is a small indicator of the possibilities. Just my personal experience. Good luck in your search for a new pup.
 

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Know who the dog came from, both parents have to be hunters, not thier grand parents. They get like 5% from the grandparents.

That said I would get the dopey lazy one. I got the hyper one and man... She is hyper!

Mike

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since u already found the preeder from where u want to buy the dog i found that when lloking for a good dog that is good with kids and melow in the blind i would sit down away from the pups and watch them didnt want the pups that fought for food or bullied the other pups i picked the one that came over to me layed in my lap and went to sleep hes 7 now got his junior field trials all 4 first time he went out for them and has been real good with the kids i would suggest that if u get a male and dont plan to breed him that u have him fixed if your kids are litle once they get older they seem to like to mount the kids or any thing holding still long enough soem think this will keep the dog from being interested in sent but that is a myth if htey love to hunt and u work with them in the off seson u will have no trouble at all just my opinion silver state kennels in sparks navada is where i got mine and had the training done awesome trainers good blood lines
 

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Absolutely!!! I never had plans to breed my male pup and had him fixed at 6 months. He is unbelievable. Great temperment and his desire to hunt and his ability to scent birds hasn't been comprimised. If anything, it keeps him focused on behaving and hunting is stead of @&%%$!!! Best thing I ever did
 

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The first thing I would ask is if the parents are OFA cerified. We know that breeding as well as early nutriton plays a part in hip dysplasia and elbow dysplasia. I would only look at pups who has parent with ratings of "good" or better. Not as common is CERF certification which looks at eye abnormalities. The problem with CERF is that it has to be renewed yearly.

There is nothing worse than having a young animal at 9 months diagnosed with hip dyspalsia. The OFA certification cannot gaurantee your pup will not have hip dysplasia, but it can increase your odds of getting a mechanically sound dog.
 
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