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I can't even begin to explain how correct you are, Rick. Just to give one of many examples: When she was about 6ish months old, I was preparing to take her out to a nearby lake to do a little training. She and I came out of the house and she watched me pick up a handful of bumpers in the garage and toss them into the back of the truck. She then, at full sprint, tried to jump into the back of the truck with the tailgate still up. She hit the top end of the tailgate and flopped onto her head and back on the concrete driveway. Looked to me like she had to have broken something. After deciding everything was ok, I decided to lift her into the truck and put her into her kennel. When we arrived at the lake, I opened the kennel door and it one smooth motion she launched out of the kennel and over the upright tailgate and once again flopped on the ground below to what looked like a second serious injury in less than 30 minutes.
Until that moment, I didn't realize that days' training would consist of working on sitting until tailgate is down and to stay in the kennel until I say 'out.' She now has those commands down very well! She's a nut!
:ROFLMAO::ROFLMAO::ROFLMAO:(y) If I'm not mistaken my late Riparian Camera Ham Sam, a generation apart from direct Cosmo breeding, did the same thing as a youngster loading up in the driveway. The one thing you'll never have to worry about is lack of desire or "get 'er done". There were sometimes things I'd wonder if they may be perceived as an obstacle to the dog (terrain, difficult crip, compliance, perseverance) but never found that to be true. just a lot of confident, but biddable, athletic dog.
 

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I can't even begin to explain how correct you are, Rick. Just to give one of many examples: When she was about 6ish months old, I was preparing to take her out to a nearby lake to do a little training. She and I came out of the house and she watched me pick up a handful of bumpers in the garage and toss them into the back of the truck. She then, at full sprint, tried to jump into the back of the truck with the tailgate still up. She hit the top end of the tailgate and flopped onto her head and back on the concrete driveway. Looked to me like she had to have broken something. After deciding everything was ok, I decided to lift her into the truck and put her into her kennel. When we arrived at the lake, I opened the kennel door and it one smooth motion she launched out of the kennel and over the upright tailgate and once again flopped on the ground below to what looked like a second serious injury in less than 30 minutes.
Until that moment, I didn't realize that days' training would consist of working on sitting until tailgate is down and to stay in the kennel until I say 'out.' She now has those commands down very well! She's a nut!
Holy sh!t, she is a nut!
Had my pup try to jump into the bed of my truck before I got the tailgate all the way down, ripped it outta my hand and slammed it down while I was still holding it. Had to take the walk of patience on that one.
 

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Saw this on another site titled "The Last Retrieve." Having lost my old, white faced yellow girl last year, this picture tugged the ol' heart strings.
And yes I am clear that is a staged picture for a Sitka Ad (I figured I'd better state this up front to curtail any arguing about gortex vs waxed cotton outerwear).

View attachment 476835
Hellofa picture
 

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:ROFLMAO::ROFLMAO::ROFLMAO:(y) If I'm not mistaken my late Riparian Camera Ham Sam, a generation apart from direct Cosmo breeding, did the same thing as a youngster loading up in the driveway. The one thing you'll never have to worry about is lack of desire or "get 'er done". There were sometimes things I'd wonder if they may be perceived as an obstacle to the dog (terrain, difficult crip, compliance, perseverance) but never found that to be true. just a lot of confident, but biddable, athletic dog.
We have desire in spades. It is interesting for me to compare current dog with previous dog and understanding that we don't know what we don't know. Previous mutt was a good dog, smart, and she was easy to be with because she was so mellow (sometimes too much so) and she got things done that were asked of her, albeit in somewhat slow motion. She slinked herself into cold water like an older guy settling into an overly warm hot tub. She was cautious. She would saunter her way out to downed birds and slow cruise back in. She never seemed overly excited about the job, but I could tell she enjoyed it and she was rock solid dependable on retrieves. She was never crazy about chasing bumpers and in fact when sitting waiting to be released for a mark, she was pretty casual about the whole thing and would look around the yard, look back at me, watch a bird fly by, then back at me. In a sentence, I'd describe previous dog as a big boned gal that wasn't very athletic but found a way to get the job of a hunting retriever done.
The new dog is a nearly polar opposite. She is athletic -- very sleek, lean, agile and quick as a cat. She has one gear -- full speed. She goes about things with absolute reckless abandon. There is zero fear in her, to the point I worry about her safety at times. I'm optimistically hopeful we'll get through the younger years without her getting hurt. She is excited about everything (except getting into the kennel in the truck). She watches marks with laser focus, hits the water with gusto and is generally very enthusiastic about learning and doing. She is no question smart, smart and any shortcomings she has as a hunting retriever will all be on me.
 

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We have desire in spades. It is interesting for me to compare current dog with previous dog and understanding that we don't know what we don't know. Previous mutt was a good dog, smart, and she was easy to be with because she was so mellow (sometimes too much so) and she got things done that were asked of her, albeit in somewhat slow motion. She slinked herself into cold water like an older guy settling into an overly warm hot tub. She was cautious. She would saunter her way out to downed birds and slow cruise back in. She never seemed overly excited about the job, but I could tell she enjoyed it and she was rock solid dependable on retrieves. She was never crazy about chasing bumpers and in fact when sitting waiting to be released for a mark, she was pretty casual about the whole thing and would look around the yard, look back at me, watch a bird fly by, then back at me. In a sentence, I'd describe previous dog as a big boned gal that wasn't very athletic but found a way to get the job of a hunting retriever done.
The new dog is a nearly polar opposite. She is athletic -- very sleek, lean, agile and quick as a cat. She has one gear -- full speed. She goes about things with absolute reckless abandon. There is zero fear in her, to the point I worry about her safety at times. I'm optimistically hopeful we'll get through the younger years without her getting hurt. She is excited about everything (except getting into the kennel in the truck). She watches marks with laser focus, hits the water with gusto and is generally very enthusiastic about learning and doing. She is no question smart, smart and any shortcomings she has as a hunting retriever will all be on me.
She probably loves the fact you crip 1/2 your birds.
 

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Holy sh!t, she is a nut!
Had my pup try to jump into the bed of my truck before I got the tailgate all the way down, ripped it outta my hand and slammed it down while I was still holding it. Had to take the walk of patience on that one.
That desire and enthusiasm are awesome. I'm constantly worrying my mutt is going to get hurt because of things like that.
Just 2 weeks ago I was out for a walk with the mutt along the edge of a good-sized river. There is a concrete platform that is about 6ish feet above the water where the river goes through a spillway to a lower section. There is always a big log jam there in the spring with driftwood and all sorts of debris in the water. I was standing on that platform looking down at all the debris. I wasn't paying much attention to the dog until she came running past me and without slowing down at all, jumped off of that platform and belly flopped into the middle of all those logs. I figured she would either be injured or drown. She wasn't really swimming but rather pulling herself from the water and up and over each big log. Took her about 15 minutes to fight her way through that tangled mess and back up the side of the river.
Remember those days when you were a teenager and you felt 10-feet tall and bullet proof and believed you could never be hurt? :oops: Damn dog is gonna give me an ulcer.
 

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That desire and enthusiasm are awesome. I'm constantly worrying my mutt is going to get hurt because of things like that.
Just 2 weeks ago I was out for a walk with the mutt along the edge of a good-sized river. There is a concrete platform that is about 6ish feet above the water where the river goes through a spillway to a lower section. There is always a big log jam there in the spring with driftwood and all sorts of debris in the water. I was standing on that platform looking down at all the debris. I wasn't paying much attention to the dog until she came running past me and without slowing down at all, jumped off of that platform and belly flopped into the middle of all those logs. I figured she would either be injured or drown. She wasn't really swimming but rather pulling herself from the water and up and over each big log. Took her about 15 minutes to fight her way through that tangled mess and back up the side of the river.
Remember those days when you were a teenager and you felt 10-feet tall and bullet proof and believed you could never be hurt? :oops: Damn dog is gonna give me an ulcer.
Yeah, I woulda flipped out. That crazy little bitch even a teen yet?
 

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Always on the ready! Staying in tip top shape, knowing the kid will be back to the table at any second. He knows 100% there is a good chance of some food hitting the floor. View attachment 476985

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That's a fact. If you want a dog's undivided attention, break out the highchair.
 

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Not really a dog picture but an overview of a fun training setup we ran the other day. Got a lot of good work done with the older dogs. Ran as a double double with blind on each.
We ran marks 1 & 2 with blind 1. Then ran marks 3 & 4 with blinds 2 and 3.

Ecoregion Map Font Line Screenshot


Most dogs did really well. Broke it down a little bit more as a taught double for some of the younger dogs freshly running master. Great day of training overall.
 

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Not really a dog picture but an overview of a fun training setup we ran the other day. Got a lot of good work done with the older dogs. Ran as a double double with blind on each.
We ran marks 1 & 2 with blind 1. Then ran marks 3 & 4 with blinds 2 and 3.

View attachment 476990

Most dogs did really well. Broke it down a little bit more as a taught double for some of the younger dogs freshly running master. Great day of training overall.
Oohhh...that gives me a headache just looking at it. :eek:
 
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